ContactLenseScience.com

June 3, 2009

The Staining Grid: A Summary of Ocular Responses to Lenses and Solutions Compatibility

Various combinations of contact lenses and care systems have been shown to produce uniquely different corneal staining patterns.  Dr. Andrasko has developed a standardized method of analyzing the cornea's physiological response to these distinctive groupings.  His on-going research demonstrates that those combinations that produce the greatest amount of staining typically cause the greatest amount of patient discomfort.


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June 2, 2009

Solution Induced Corneal Staining (SICS)

Lyndon Jones was among the early pioneers first describing corneal staining associated with contact lens care products.  Dr. Jones is a Professor at the University of Waterloo in Canada and is a well-respected researcher in the area of contact lenses and related corneal science.

He describes his early work exploring corneal staining PHMB and group II contact lens materials. This research was the first to link preservatives and materials with corneal staining.  Dr. Jones also describes his landmark study regarding staining with silicone hydrogel materials and MPS preservatives which led to intense focus on this area.

Key points to keep in mind is that solution related staining is often asymptomatic, material and formulation dependent and, to some extent, patient dependent.


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June 1, 2009

Contact Lens and Solution Interactions as a Function of Time

Dr. Renee Garofalo serves as Associate Director of Research and Development at Alcon R&D.  She describes her pioneering work in preservative uptake and release – specifically how lenses and solutions interact and how the resultant uptake and release of disinfectant impacts corneal integrity in the lens wearer.

Her work uncovered compelling evidence that corneal staining is a time and material and solution dependent phenomenon.  This allowed prediction of peak staining times for each combination.  The consequences of this have been substantial both for clinicians as well as in the design and testing of new lens car products.

Future directions for study include investigation of inflammatory consequences of corneal disturbance, the impact of corneal compromise on barrier function and the interrelation between lens related surface damage and dry eye.


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Topics

     Basic Science
     Biocompatibility
     Disinfection
     Uptake/Release
     Wetting
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